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Submitted: 10 Jul 2023
Accepted: 24 Sep 2023
ePublished: 04 Dec 2023
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J Renal Inj Prev. 2024;13(2): e32248.
doi: 10.34172/jrip.2023.32248
  Abstract View: 228
  PDF Download: 59

Review

Cancer-associated thrombotic microangiopathy; a review article

Elham Saffarieh 1 ORCID logo, Fahimeh Nokhostin 2 ORCID logo, Azadeh Yousefnezhad 3 ORCID logo, Seyedeh Reyhaneh Yousefi Sharemi 4* ORCID logo

1 Uterine Bleeding Research Center, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, Iran
2 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Shahid Sadughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran
3 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
4 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj, Iran
*Corresponding Author: Seyedeh Reyhaneh Yousefi Sharemi, Email: Yousefi805@yahoo.com

Abstract

Cancer-associated thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is a rare but is a serious complication that can occur in individuals with malignancy. It is characterized by widespread small blood vessel thrombosis (formation of blood clots) in various organs of the body, leading to organ damage and dysfunction. The exact mechanisms underlying cancer-associated TMA are not fully understood. However, several factors may contribute to its development. Cancer cells can release procoagulant substances that promote blood clot formation, since some tumors can directly invade blood vessels, leading to endothelial cell damage and activation of the coagulation system. Additionally, certain chemotherapeutic agents used in cancer treatment can have adverse effects on the endothelium, further increasing the risk of TMA. Clinically, cancer-associated TMA presents with a range of symptoms depending on the organs affected. Common manifestations include microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and organ-specific symptoms such as neurological deficits, renal dysfunction, or cardiac abnormalities.

Implication for health policy/practice/research/medical education:

Cancer-associated thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is a rare complication that can occur in individuals with malignancy. It is characterized by the formation of blood clots within small blood vessels, leading to organ damage and dysfunction. Cancer-associated TMA can affect multiple organs in the body, including the kidneys, brain, heart, and gastrointestinal system. Symptoms may vary depending on the organs involved but can include fatigue, neurological symptoms, kidney dysfunction, and signs of anemia.

Please cite this paper as: Saffarieh E, Nokhostin F, Yousefnezhad A, Yousefi Sharemi SR. Cancer-associated thrombotic microangiopathy; a review article. J Renal Inj Prev. 2024; 13(2): e32248. doi: 10.34172/jrip.2023.32248.

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